Archives for the ‘Workforce Development’ Category

Prepare for the Unexpected: October is National Fire Prevention Month

Written by Mary Hallock, IMEC Technical SpecialistFire Prevention Tips

October is National Fire Prevention Month — a great time to ensure your workforce is prepared for all types of emergencies. Start by reviewing any emergency procedures and documentation you have for the organization. Are they up-to-date? Do your staff know how to respond in the event of an emergency?

Fire in a business setting can cause an interruption in production, loss of revenue, and even worse, it could put your team at great risk. Understanding a few simple preparedness techniques may save you from a future catastrophe.

Affecting perception: 8 ways to advance the image of manufacturing

A positive perception of manufacturing is critical for the future success of an organization’s talent recruitment, development, and overall industry advancement. Craig Giffi and Michelle Drew Rodriguez, manufacturing experts from Deloitte, share the latest on advancing the image of manufacturing in celebration of MFG Day in America.

workforce perceptionAmerican public perception of manufacturing, and where Americans see the manufacturing sector is headed, is optimistic. That’s according to a recent study conducted by Deloitte, the National Association of Manufacturers, and The Manufacturing Institute.[i]

Bringing Diversity to Manufacturing

Written by Melissa Basa, IMEC Regional Manager

With more than 500,000 unfilled manufacturing jobs in the United States in recent years, much has been hypothesized and written about the cause(s). If we consider the words of Warren Buffet, who in 2013 told Fortune Magazine that America has built our prosperity using only 50%Diversity of our talent and left an entire gender out of the equation for most of our history, we see that a solution is very much within our reach.  But balancing the gender equation and bringing more women into manufacturing doesn’t require the same approach as increasing the ranks of men.  Let’s look at an example (or three) from my Alma Mater.

In 2016, Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering was the first US national research university to graduate an undergraduate class of engineers that was more than 50% female.  Compare this to the national average that has yet to break 20%.  But gender parity didn’t happen for Thayer overnight and it certainly didn’t happen without intentional cultural changes.  I believe Thayer’s successes could be those of America’s shop floors as well.

Training for Success As We Face the Maintenance Skills Gap

Written by Lawrence Bouvier, CMRP
Vice President – Fuss & O’Neill Manufacturing Solutions

A large amount of industrial maintenance technicians are approaching retirement age – taking with them invaluable knowleTraining for Successdge and experience. Today’s workforce entrants often have high school level vocational training and apprenticeship programs are nearly non-existent. All too often, employers try to fill this void with computer-based learning that focuses merely on craft skills. But hands-on practice is required to develop hands-on skills. Additionally, tradespeople need to understand more than basic craft skills; they need to be expert problem solvers with process knowledge specific to their companies. How do employers close the skills gap?

Common misconceptions for aligning Total Productive Maintenance with your business strategy

Written by Roger Shrum, IMEC Regional Manager

Recently in conversation with manufacturers I have fielded questions about Total Productive Total Productive MaintenanceMaintenance (TPM) and what it might do for their business. It is eye opening for me to realize many manufacturing leaders are unclear about TPM and how it serves as a strategic element of the robust Lean program many clients believe they have deployed.  Several key reasons exist for this disconnect. The following explores those reasons and offers suggestions to overcome the misconceptions.

10 Myths about Training Within Industry Job Instruction

Training Within IndustryWritten by Mary Hallock, IMEC Technical Specialist and TWI Certified Trainer

Training Within Industry (TWI) is a proven job training methodology that has been implemented successfully by companies for decades. Given the challenges of today’s skills gap, it is critical to have systematic approaches to train and retrain staff. Yet, we hear plenty of myths about TWI… allow me to help dispel the myths and set you on a path to TWI success.

When Engaged Employees Prosper, Businesses Succeed

How do you use employee engagement to retain key employees?

Written by Ashley Beaudoin, IMEC Technical Specialist and HR Specialist

As manufacturing advances, companies report sizable skill gaps. The need for a qualified skill set is essential for success.  In order to keep a business growing, qualified candidates need to surface while key employees are retained.employee engagement

Leaders are familiar with the basic understanding of employee engagement. However, do they know just how engagement affects the workforce?

Empower Employee Health and Wellness

Reduce injuries and improve management of Workers’ Compensation across the organization

Written by Lori Amerman, IMEC Operations Coordinator and OSHA Authorized Trainer

In my 20 years in Occupational Safety and Health Management, I have had the pleasure of learning from a variety of experts, employers and employees as they share their Workers’ Compensation experiences. Recently the annual Workers’ Compensation Symposium organized by the Southern Illinois Healthcare’s Work.Care.Ready.Well program provided a great opportunity to revisit many of the best practices.

Linguistic and Cultural Barriers in Manufacturing: Understanding the Language of the Workforce

Written by Emilia Linardakis, Managing Partner – Language Advisors Network Group

language advisorsManufacturing is one of the most lucrative industries in the U.S. and there are about 251,857 manufacturing firms currently in the United States. Due to migration patterns, language and cultural diversity are becoming a theme in the majority of the workplaces. The manufacturing industry is one of the most diversified sectors of economy with a vast number of immigrant workers. 12% or 23.8 million immigrants work in the manufacturing industry. These workers have either no knowledge or very limited proficiency in English. The number of non-English speakers in the US has grown considerably in the last few years due to the influx of immigration levels that continue to increase drastically based on the Census Bureau. Foreign-born workforce is becoming a vital part of the US economy, especially in the manufacturing sector. National Census data shows that there are nearly 64.7 million U.S. residents who speak a language other than English at home; that makes about 21.5% of the total U.S. population. Approximately 46% of immigrant workers are considered limited English proficiency (LEP). Over the last two decades the types of jobs available for workers with limited English proficiency have changed. Many U.S. manufacturing jobs that used to be performed from LEP employees have now been outsourced.

Tri-State Manufacturing Conference Focuses on Manufacturing Success

manufacturing conference

The first Tri-State Manufacturing Conference for Illinois, Iowa and Missouri will take place March 15 to help companies of all sizes learn more about emerging trends in the new era of manufacturing.

The event will take place at John Wood Community College in Quincy, Illinois, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Key educational, business and economic development partners from three states have joined forces to create the conference to help regional manufacturers develop employees, processes and technology to grow business and expand into new markets.

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